• Zadzwoń do nas: 534 500 550
PL EN

EXERCISES SUPPORTING HAND AND FINGER FITNESS AS WELL AS COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN PRE-SCHOOL AND SCHOOL CHILDREN BASED ON THE ROTATOR
PEDAGOGICAL THERAPIST

The observations carried out during classes at psychological and pedagogical counselling centres showed that children do exercises with the use of innovative equipment such as the Rotator very eagerly. The presented selected exercises constitute an introduction to classes carried out with Rotator S. They support the effectiveness of appropriate therapy through active action and strong stimulation of the exercised senses and muscles. They constitute an alternative to electronic educational aids, training spatial vision and stimulating correct movements of specific parts of the body. 

A set of exercises in a printed version is attached to Rotator S. Individuals and companies that have purchased the Rotator thus acquired the right to download and copy the selected published exercises. The author of the exercises is Anna Korczyńska-Witczak, who works as a pedagogue and pedagogical therapist at a psychological and pedagogical counselling centre.

Exercise 1. Threading the shoelace.

Main objective: Supporting the development of fine motor skills.
Specific objectives: Shaping a pincer grasp. Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus. Shaping the knowledge of the concept of a circle.

In order to do the exercise, we will need a perforated dial with geometric figures and coloured shoelaces which are contained in the help set attached to the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The end of the shoelace should be tied on the back side of the Rotator’s dial. The child's task is to first thread the first shoelace through the holes placed next to each other in the outer row of holes of the Rotator. The shoelace must be threaded through every second hole. This way, there will be room left for a shoelace in the second colour. We repeat the action, starting from an empty space. After completing the task, the shape of a circle designated by means of two colours of shoelaces will be visible. We should name the created shape together with the child. Together with the child, we should slide our finger over the shoelace to consolidate the shape of the figure and the movement pattern that is important when creating the shape of the circle in the child's mind. 

Remarks on how to do the exercise: The height of the tripod must be adjusted to the child's height. During the exercise, we may reduce or increase the distance between the child and Rotator so as to adjust the degree of difficulty to the child’s abilities. In order to increase the degree of difficulty, we may switch on the Rotator’s rotation, establish its optimal rotation speed and the side to which the dial will rotate.
The shoelace is quite long, so to avoid getting discouraged with too many repetitions, it is advisable to help the child by lightly pushing the shoelace from the back of the Rotator’s dial. We must also follow the needs and abilities of the child as well as watch the way in which the exercise is done.

Exercise 2. Creating geometrical figures.

Main objective: Supporting the development of geometric intuitions.
Specific objectives: Shaping the knowledge of geometrical figures, such as a rectangle, a square, a circle, a triangle. Shaping the ability to create geometrical figures. Shaping concepts such as a side, an edge, an angle. Shaping a pincer grasp. Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need a perforated dial with geometric figures, coloured rubber bands, and pins in two colours which are contained in the help set attached to the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The tutor creates a rectangles by means of pins and rubber bands. The tutor asks the question: do you know the name of the created geometrical figure? If the child does not know its name, the tutor calls the given figure. Then, the tutor asks How can we describe a rectangle? If the child has a problem with it, the tutor asks additional questions regarding e.g. the number of sides, their length i (are they the same length, are some sides shorter, are the other sides longer, etc.) and other possible guidelines found in the name of the figure. Then, the tutor summarises the characteristics of a given geometric figure and extends them with the concepts such as an angle, an edge of the figure, etc. Each time, the tutor demonstrates the individual elements of the figure to the child through a pointing gesture, and then asks the child to repeat the given actions after them. The tutor shows step by steps how to create a given figure by means of pins and rubber bands. Next to the rectangle created, the tutor places a drawing representing this figure and asks the child to try to place their own rectangle on the Rotator’s dial. At the end, the child slides their finger over the figure created by the child and by the tutor to consolidate the movement pattern present during creating the shape of a rectangle. 

Rotator pomoce dydaktyczne dla terapeuty psychologiczno-pedagogicznego

Remarks on how to do the exercise: The above scheme may be applied likewise to other geometrical figures. It is important for the child to slide their finger on a given geometric figure minimum three times so that they can remember the movement pattern necessary to build a given geometric figure. The aim is to identify individual fixed elements of the figure so that it can be built. Training on the Rotator may constitute a summary of the topic concerning geometrical figures or an introduction to classes on this subject.

The height of the tripod must be adjusted to the child's height.
If the classes concern a detailed description of a given figure, focus on a maximum of two geometrical figures. If the classes conducted are more generally related to the names of figures and their recognition, all figures can be discussed based on their mutual contrast.

Exercise 3. Threading.

Main objective: Supporting the development of fine motor skills.
Specific objectives: Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus. Shaping the knowledge of the concept of a circle.

In order to do the exercise, we will need a perforated dial with geometric figures, coloured shoelaces, and beads in three colours which are contained in the help set attached to the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The end of the shoelace should be tied on the back side of the Rotator. The child's task is to first thread the first shoelace through the hole placed in the outer row of holes, and then thread the beads on the shoelace, one after the other. Then, the shoelace must be threaded through the next hole so that the beads are in the horizontal plane in order to create a sequence. We repeat these actions until the whole shoelace is used. The first shoelace must be threaded through every second hole. This way, there will be room left for a shoelace in the second colour. We tie the second shoelace on the back side of the Rotator’s dial, starting from an empty space. Thanks to this, we will fill the empty spaces with the shoelace in the second colour. After completing the task, the shape of a circle designated by means of colourful shoelaces will be visible. 

ćwiczenia z Rotatorem

Remarks on how to do the exercise: The beads should be threaded with two types of grasps: the child holds the bead between the thumb and the index finger or between the thumb and the middle finger. This way, the child exercises the opposition of the tips of an index finger, a middle finger and a thumb. Mastering this opposition results in an improvement of the grasp of a writing tool while writing. The height of the tripod must be adjusted to the child's height. The shoelace is very long and the children can become easily discouraged during too many repetitions, therefore it is advisable to help them by lightly pushing the shoelace from the back side of the Rotator’s dial. We must also follow the needs and abilities of the child as well as watch the way in which the exercise is done.

Exercise 4. A dictation with pins.

Main objective: Supporting the development of sequential and auditory memory.
Specific objectives: Shaping spatial orientation in a limited space. Learning and consolidating the knowledge of the directions: up, down, right, left. Shaping sequential memory. Shaping auditory focus and memory. Shaping the ability to create rhythms. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping information coding and decoding skills. Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need a perforated dial with geometric figures, coloured rubber bands, and pins in two colours which are contained in the help set attached to the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The tutor places the pin in the place from where the child will start the exercise. Then, the tutor dictates the commands regarding: the colour of the pin, the number of pins to be used, as well as the position of the next pin on the Rotator’s dial. An example of three sequences expressed one after the other: “Take one red pin, put it in the hole under the pin that is already there.” Then, we use short commands: blue pin to the right, blue pin to the right, red pin up, red pin to the right, red pin down, blue pin to the right, blue pin to the right, red pin up, red pin to the right, red pin down, blue pin to the right, blue pin to the right, red pin up, etc. Next, we say to the child: “Now it is your turn, please continue.” 
IMPORTANT! One sequence must be repeated at least three3 times so that the child notices repeatability and the pattern according to which they should continue the sequence. If the child has difficulty noticing the regularity, it is worth marking each sequence with a rubber band in order to extract the given sequence and make it easy to be noticed by the child.
The tutor asks the child to create their own sequence and dictate it to the tutor so that they may put this pattern on the Rotator’s dial. We ask the child to repeat the sequence three times. The child may take the pins they need and arrange in front of them, ar draw a pattern on a sheet of paper so that it is easier for them to dictate the created sequence. The exercise must be done according to the principle of gradation of difficulty. It is worth remembering that children should also train the opposition of the fingertips of the middle finger and the thumb.

Rotator pomoce dydaktyczne ćwiczenia

Exercise 5. A clapped sequence.

Main objective: Supporting the development of sequential and auditory memory.
Specific objectives: Shaping sequential memory. Shaping auditory focus and memory. Shaping the ability to create rhythms. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping information coding and decoding skills. Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need pins in two colours, hoops and rubber bands. The necessary aids are contained in the set attached to the basic board of the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The tutor puts colourful pins, rubber bands and rings next to the child. Then, the tutor asks the child to focus their attention as the tutor will clap the rhythm. The child's task is to identify the rhythm which will be clapped ent and repeated three times, and then visualise it the didactic aids received from the tutor before beginning the task. Then the child reads the rhythm they have created, while the tutor checks the correctness of this rhythm. Then, the child creates their own rhythm and claps it so that the tutor can visualise it using the didactic aids available. Example: The tutor claps once, makes a short pause, claps twice in a row, makes a pause, and then claps three times in a row. They repeat this sequence of movements three times so that the child can identify the whole sequence and then visualise using the didactic aids. 

Rotator ćwiczenia dla wyklaskiwana sekwencja

Remarks on how to do the exercise: Clapping may be replaced with: musical instruments, stamping, rhythm tapping, etc.

The principle of gradation of difficulty as well as adapting the exercise to the needs of the child are particularly important during this exercise. As the exercise is demanding in itself, the child must demonstrate a high level of concentration and auditory attention as well as use sequential memory.

Exercise 6. 3D figures.

Main objective: Consolidating characteristic features and formulas of basic geometric figures.

Specific objectives: Shaping the ability to create geometrical figures. Consolidating formulas regarding the total surface area, perimeters and diagonals of geometrical figures. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need pins in two colours and rubber bands. The necessary aids are contained in the set attached to the basic board of the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The exercise consists in creating geometrical figures on the Rotator’s board by means of colourful pins. Using the rubber bands, mark the elements characteristic for individual geometric figures, e.g. height, diagonals, cathetus, hypotenuse, base, etc. After creating the given geometrical figure on the Rotator’s board, the child’s task is to give the formulas for the total surface area and perimeter of the figure, and then complete the data in the formulas based on the drawings. The necessary data, such as the lengths of sides, diagonals, or heights, must be measured with a measuring tape.

Rotator figury geometryczne

Exercise 7. Rhythmic beads.

Main objective: Supporting the development of sequential memory.
Specific objectives: Shaping the ability to create rhythms. Shaping information coding and decoding skills. Shaping sequential memory. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb. Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need a shoelace and beads.

Course of the exercise: The end of the shoelace should be blocked (tied) on the back side of the Rotator’s dial. The child's task is to first thread the shoelace through the hole placed in the outer row of holes, and then thread the beads on the shoelace according to the sequence dictated by the tutor. After that, the child threads the shoelace through the hole at the end of the Rotator so that the beads are in the horizontal plane in order to create a sequence. After dictating the sequence three times, the child continues threading on their own according to the pattern established by the tutor.

ćwiczenie z Rotatorem

During this exercise, it is important that the child threads the beads on the shoelace with the thumb and the index finger alternating with the thumb and the middle finger, without using the other fingers.

The number of beads used during the exercise is not given on purpose. This depends on the child’s individual memory capabilities. 

Exercise 8. Recreating shapes based on the pattern.

Main objective: Supporting the development of the skill of recreating shapes based on the pattern.
Specific objectives: Shaping short-term memory. Shaping information coding and decoding skills. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb. Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need pins in two colours which are contained in the set attached to the basic board of the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The tutor places a shape on the Rotator’s board. The child's task is to recreate this shape accurately so that it is next to the tutor’s shape. Then, the child creats a shape for the tutor, the tutor recreates the shape and places is next to the child’s shape. 

Odwzorowywanie kształtów według wzoru

Remarks on how to do the exercise: It is worth starting with a simple shape that will be easy to recreate. It is important for the child to feel successful with the sense that they have carried out this task independently. Then, we may gradually increase the degree of difficulty.

Exercise 9. Recreating shapes from memory.

Main objective: Supporting the development of the skill of recreating shapes from memory.
Specific objectives: Shaping short-term memory. Shaping information coding and decoding skills. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb. Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need pins in two colours which are contained in the set attached to the basic board of the Rotator.

Course of the exercise: The tutor draws the chosen shape on a separate sheet of paper. The child's task is to recreate this shape accurately so that it is next to the tutor’s shape. However, the child has a limited time to remember this shape and to recreate it from memory. After this time, e.g. 3 minutes, the tutor covers the sheet with the shape. The child's task is to recreate this shape from memory as best as possible. 

Odwzorowywanie kształtów z pamięci

Remarks on how to do the exercise: In order to facilitate the task, the tutor may draw a shape on a grid sheet, thanks to which the child will remember the pattern more easily, as it will be placed in a limited space created with grids. If the tutor wants to increase the difficulty, they can place the shape on a white sheet of paper. The child will not have a reference point as they have to carefully plan the distribution of the particular elements on the Rotator’s board.

An additional element deciding about the task’s degree of difficulty is a time limit to remember of no time limit. If we establish a time limit, we may also give more or less time to do the task, e.g. 5 minutes, 3 minutes, or 1 minute. The task will be much easier for the child if they do not have a time limit to remember the shape. If we want to train short-term memory, it is best to introduce a time limit. Yet, if it is important that the child learns the shape for a longer time, we do not use the time limit.

Exercise 10. The four seasons of the year.

Main objective: Supporting sequential memory and temporal orientation.
Specific objectives: Shaping the ability to create rhythms. Shaping the knowledge of the seasons of the year, their order and their characteristic features. Shaping information coding and decoding skills. Shaping sequential memory. Shaping iconic representation (e.g. visual and auditory imagery). Shaping a pincer grasp (the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb). Shaping the opposition of the tips of an index finger and a thumb. Shaping eye-hand coordination. Shaping attention focus.

In order to do the exercise, we will need a shoelace and beads in four colours.

Course of the exercise: The end of the shoelace should be tied on the back side of the basic dial of the Rotator. The child's task is to first thread the shoelace through the hole placed in the outer row of holes, and then thread the beads on the shoelace, one after the other, according to the order of the seasons of the year:

-   the green bead symbolises spring

-   the red bead symbolises summer

-   the yellow bead symbolises autumn

-   the blue bead symbolises winter                                                                            

Next, the child carries out the sequence three times according to the tutor’s guidelines. Then, the child continues the pattern on their own. After that, the child threads the shoelace through the last hole of the Rotator so that the beads are in the horizontal plane in order to create a sequence. The child’s task is to say the names of the seasons of the year out loud. The child points out which season of the year is the first, which is the second, which is the third and which is the last one. It is worth consolidating the name of each season of the year by means of associating the features which are characteristic for this season only.

ćwiczenie cztery pory roku